Chamomile Flowers – Certified Organic (Dried)

£3.90£16.90

Whole Organic Chamomile Flowers
Product of: Hay Meadow Farm
Pack Size (Nett Weight): 50g / 100g / 250g / 500g

Clear
SKU: hdcha Category: Tags: , , , ,

Description

Chamomile Flowers:
Other Common Names: Mayweed, scented mayweed, pinheads, pineapple weed, german-hundskamille. Botanical Name: chamomilla, matricaria recutita, Chamomilla recutita.

The entire above-ground portion of the plant can be used. The flowers are edible and can be used raw to top salads. The chamomile flowers are also often dried and used in tea or added to the bath. They may also be pressed for their oil. The leaves are dried and used in aromatherapy and other herbal medicines.

It may surprise you just how many things you can do with chamomile. For example, at Juni in Manhattan, pastry chef Mina Pizzaro infuses the flower into ice cream, highlighted with yuzu and ginger. To get the flavour of the chamomile out of the plant and into the dessert, Pizzaro steeps it in cream for hours prior to churning. “The flavour lends a natural gentle sweetness and pleasant floral notes to the dessert,” she says, adding that the spiciness of ginger and acidity of yuzu help to strike a perfect balance.

Chamomile works in non-dessert applications as well, as chef Craig Richards has done in Atlanta at St. Cecilia. His pièce de résistance: scallop crudo with chamomile-celery oil. “We decided to use chamomile because it’s a unique ingredient you don’t see very often in savoury cooking,” he says. “It brings another element of acidity and herbal flavour that plays very well with raw fish, especially the natural sweetness of the raw scallop.” Richards has developed a technique for extracting the plant’s flavour as well. “We blend it for an extended period of time so that it heats up in the blender and releases its essential oil.” He also suggests making a dried chamomile and salt rub for fish and throwing some fresh blossoms in a spring salad.

Storage:
“How long do dried herbs last?”
Depends on both the type of herb and the conditions under which they are stored. Correctly dried and stored herbs, do not actually spoil. But over time, they will lose their potency, aroma and flavour.

As a general rule, whole dried herbs (not been ground) will last much longer than ground and can last for 1 to 3 years. It is also never a bad idea to freeze any spare herbs, try to remove as much air as possible and make sure
Here are some tips for maximising the shelf life of your herbs:
• Store in an airtight container.
• Store in a cool, dark cupboard.
• Store away from direct heat or sunlight.
• Keep lid tightly closed when not in use.