Brown Lentils – Certified Organic

£2.32£16.90

Brown Lentils – Certified Organic
Product of: Turkey
Pack Size: 250g | 500g | 1kg | 2kg | 5kg
Organic Certification: GB-ORG-02; GB-ORG-05; TR-BIO-01; NL-BIO-01

Clear
SKU: bpble Category: Tags: , , ,

Description

Brown Lentils – Certified Organic
Product of: Turkey
Pack Size: 250g | 500g | 1kg | 2kg | 5kg
Organic Certification: GB-ORG-02; GB-ORG-05; TR-BIO-01; NL-BIO-01

Non-GMO:
This product has been produced without the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or their derivatives, nor been irradiated.

Packaging:
250g | 500g | 1kg  packed into food grade, foil lined, zip lock (resealable), stand up pouches, Made with superior quality KRAFT PAPER.
2kg | 5kg packed into food grade, zip lock (resealable), stand up poly pouches.

Both packs are multi-material and multi-layer to increase shelf life of the product and provide a barrier protection against moisture, odours, and UV light.

Additional Information:
Large, flat brown lentils that retain their shape well during cooking. Brown lentils are slightly stronger in flavour than green lentils, with a solid skin. Use them in soups, casseroles, rice dishes and savoury bakes.

Lentils are a mainstay of vegetarian cuisine. But they come in a bewildering variety of colours, and many cooks are uncertain about which ones to choose. Brown, black, green, red, yellow – what’s the difference between these various types? And which ones should you use in your favourite recipes?

In fact, the answer is very simple. All you need to remember is that lentils fall into two broad classes: the red, and the rest.

The Red
Red or “split” lentils (they’re actually a bright orange colour) are different from all the other types in two important respects. They need much less cooking time (less than ten minutes). And they disintegrate into a mush when cooked. Because of this second point, red lentils are unsuitable for most lentil recipes. So you should avoid using them for vegetarian moussaka, lentil roast, lentil shepherd’s pie, veggie burgers, or anything similar.

But that doesn’t mean that red lentils have no place in your kitchen. On the contrary, they come into their own for making lentil soup, and they are also very useful for thickening stews and casseroles – not to mention adding a worthwhile helping of protein to those dishes.

Another good use is in making Indian dhal. To do that, boil the lentils in plenty of water. In a separate pan, lightly fry some onion, garlic and tomato. Drain the cooked lentils, add in the onion mixture, and then add some spices, such as chilli, ginger or turmeric – but don’t overdo it; dhal is meant to be mild. Serve with rice or naan bread.

You might also come across yellow lentils. These are very similar to the red variety and should be cooked in the same way.

The Rest
The second broad class of lentils include brown (the most common type in the USA), green, and black, as well as specialist varieties such as Puy (grown in the Haute-Loire region of France), “French” (which are actually Puy lentils but are grown in North America), beluga (so-called because they resemble beluga caviar) and macchiatos (used in Mexican cuisine).

These varieties differ considerably in taste and texture. But when it comes to cooking, they are more or less interchangeable. If your recipe doesn’t specify a particular variety, use whatever you have to hand. I suspect that in a blind tasting test, a non-expert would be hard pressed to tell the difference.

These types of lentils all keep their shape after cooking, which makes them suitable for any of the recipes mentioned above. They take longer to cook than the red variety: anything from 25 to 45 minutes. Follow the cooking time stated on the label, if any, or test them by tasting; they are ready when completely soft.

As well as hot dishes, these varieties go well in salads. Cook them first. Then drain them, and stir in a generous measure of olive oil or a vinaigrette dressing. Leave to cool for at least a couple of hours. Before serving, add fresh chopped herbs, such as parsley, chives or tarragon.

Lentils are grown in rotation with wheat and other cereals. Despite thorough cleaning it is only possible to supply lentils with a tolerance for cereal grains that may translate to a gluten content on the borderline of the 20ppm limit (influenced by cereal variety, grain size and variable gluten content). Customers are advised to take their own precautions when using or labelling this product.

Storage Advice:
Dried beans & pulses last for years, However the older they are the longer they will take to cook. Canned beans last for years and fresh beans last about a week.

You can help dried and canned beans stay fresh longer by storing them in a cool, dark place at a temperature under 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Fresh beans are best kept in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

Once cooked, beans should be stored in a tightly closed container to keep out moisture and other contaminants and then placed in the fridge. Always place leftover product into a proper airtight container before storing in the fridge. For a long-term option, you can freeze your beans while preserving their taste if you use a freezer safe container.

Some benefits of proper food storage include eating healthier, cutting food costs and helping the environment by avoiding waste.

 

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

(typical values per 100g):

Energy

1477

kj
Energy

353

kcal
Fat

1.0

g
  Of which saturates 

0.1

g
Carbohydrate

59.6

g
  Of which sugars

2.0

g
Fibre

30.5

g
Protein

25.8

g
Salt

0.0

g
 

 

ALLERGY INFORMATION

Does the product contain any of the following?

YES NO
Cereals containing Gluten: wheat, rye, barley, oats, spelt, kamut or their hybridised strains.  * *
Mollusc
Crustacean  shellfish and products thereof
Egg and products thereof
Fish and products thereof
Soya (soy) beans & protein and products thereof
Milk & Dairy (including lactose) and products thereof
Celery Seeds celeriac and products thereof
Mustard Seeds and products thereof
Lupin and products thereof
Sesame Seed and products thereof
Peanuts and products thereof
Nuts and products thereof (namely almond, hazelnut, walnut, cashew nut, pecan nut, brazil nut, pistachio nut, macademia nut and Queensland nut)
Added Sulphur Dioxide: (the product contains <10mg/Kg added Sulphur Dioxide in the form of SO2, Sulphites (E220,E221, E222, E223, E224, E226, E227, E228)
Please Note: Where products are indicated as not having an allergen present this refers to the product not being formulated or wholly derived from the particular ingredient. Allergen handling policies and procedures are in place through the supply chain to reduce the likelihood of cross contamination from allergens however this cannot be guaranteed.

 

*Lentils are grown in rotation with wheat and other cereals. Despite thorough cleaning it is only possible to supply lentils with a tolerance for cereal grains that may translate to a gluten content on the borderline of the 20ppm limit (influenced by cereal variety, grain size and variable gluten content). Customers are advised to take their own precautions when using or labelling this product.

Please contact us if you require any further information or for quotes on larger pack sizes.