Arrowroot (Ground) – Certified Organic

£1.63£9.35

Arrowroot (Ground) – Certified Organic
Product of: St. Vincent
Pack Size: 25g | 50g | 100g | 250g | 500g
Organic Certification: GB-ORG-02; GB-ORG-04

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Description

Arrowroot (Ground) – Certified Organic
Product of: St. Vincent
Pack Size: 25g | 50g | 100g | 250g | 500g
Organic Certification: GB-ORG-02

Ingredients: All Organically Certified; Coriander; Cinnamon (Cassia); Ginger; Fennel; Nutmeg; Cloves

Non-GMO:
This product has been produced without the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or their derivatives, nor been irradiated.

Packaging:
25g | 50g | 100g | 250g | 500g – packed into food grade, foil lined, zip lock (resealable), stand up pouches, Made with superior quality KRAFT PAPER.

Packs are multi-material and multi-layer to increase shelf life of the product and provide a barrier protection against moisture, odours, and UV light.

Additional Information:
Derived from the root of the Cassava plant, the dried powder is highly effective as a thickener. Use for gravy, puddings, blancmange and the like.

Arrowroot is a starch obtained from the rhizomes (rootstock) of several tropical plants, traditionally Maranta arundinacea, but also Florida arrowroot from Zamia integrifolia, and tapioca from cassava (Manihot esculenta), which is often labelled as arrowroot. Polynesian arrowroot or pia (Tacca leontopetaloides), and Japanese arrowroot (Pueraria lobata), also called kudzu, are used in similar ways.

Saint Vincent has a long history of arrowroot production. The industry started as the food and medicine of the Carib and Garifuna peoples, and developed to the status of a major export of St. Vincent during the period 1900 to 1965. It became an important commodity in colonial trade in the 1930s. As the sugar industry declined in the nineteenth century, cultivation of arrowroot was developed to fill the void. Since then, the area cultivated has declined steadily as other crops, particularly bananas, have gained wider acceptance by farmers. Evidence of its former importance is indicated by the ruins of the various magnificent 19th-century factories located in valleys on the St. Vincent mainland.

Arrowroot cultivation is now concentrated on farms located north of the Rabacca River, particularly in the Owia area. This is also the area where the population of Carib descent is concentrated. In 1998/99, the industry produced 312,000 lb (142,000 kg) of starch, about 3% of the peak level in the 1960s.

In the past, the St. Vincent arrowroot industry played an important role in the economy of the island, contributing close to 50% of the country’s foreign export earnings, and was the principal source of employment and income of the rural people from the 1930s to the 1960s.

The plant is propagated from rhizomes and cultivation takes place at elevations up to 300 metres on the eastern and windward facing side of the highlands of St. Vincent. Cultivation covers an area of about 3,700 ha and some 80% of the crop is grown by small farmers. The arrowroot plant is very hardy and not very demanding in its requirements. St. Vincent, particularly the north-east coast, provides the ideal growing conditions for optimal yields; deep, well drained, slightly acidic soils and a hot, humid climate. Some farmers produce the crop by shifting cultivation on the cleared forested slopes.

The harvesting season extends from October to May. On the larger estates, the harvesting of the rhizome usually proceeds from the base of a hill towards the top. Harvesting involves breaking off the rhizome from the shoot. Planting and harvesting are inter-related in that when the rhizomes are harvested the shoot is replanted at the same time. In St. Vincent, much use is made of rural unemployment and many women workers are involved in the various phases of operation. Mechanical harvesters have recently been introduced, allowing faster arrowroot harvesting.

Six factories process the island’s arrowroot and large processing plants are located at Belle Vue and at Owia.

Arrowroot was very popular in the Victorian era, and Napoleon supposedly said the reason for the British love of arrowroot was to support the commerce of their colonies. It can be consumed in the form of biscuits, puddings, jellies, cakes, hot sauces, and also with beef tea, milk or veal broth. Kudzu arrowroot (Pueraria lobata) is used in noodles in Korean and Vietnamese cuisine. In the Victorian era it was used, boiled with a little flavouring added, as an easily digestible food for children and people with dietary restrictions. In Burma, arrowroot tubers, which are called artarlut, are boiled or steamed and eaten with salt and oil.

Arrowroot makes clear, shimmering fruit gels and prevents ice crystals from forming in homemade ice cream. It can also be used as a thickener for acidic foods, such as East Asian sweet and sour sauce. It is used in cooking to produce a clear, thickened sauce, such as a fruit sauce. It will not make the sauce go cloudy, like corn-starch, flour, or other starchy thickening agents would.

The lack of gluten in arrowroot flour makes it useful as a replacement for wheat flour for those with a gluten intolerance. It is, however, relatively high in carbohydrates and low in protein (approximately 7.7%) and does not provide a complete substitute for wheat flour in bread-making.

Arrowroot thickens at a lower temperature than flour or corn-starch, is not weakened by acidic ingredients, has a more neutral taste, and is not affected by freezing. It does not mix well with dairy, forming a slimy mixture. It is recommended that arrowroot be mixed with a cool liquid before adding to a hot fluid. The mixture should be heated only until the mixture thickens and removed immediately to prevent the mixture from thinning. Overheating tends to break down arrowroot’s thickening property. Two teaspoons of arrowroot can be substituted for one tablespoon of corn-starch, or one teaspoon of arrowroot for one tablespoon of wheat flour.

additional info courtesy of Wikipedia.

 Storage Advice:
“How long do spices last?”

Depends on both the type of spice and the conditions under which they are stored. Correctly dried and stored spices do not actually spoil. But over time, they will lose their potency, aroma and flavour.

As a general rule, whole dried spices (not been ground) will last much longer than ground and can last for 1 to 3 years. Pre-ground spices do still always work very well but if possible buy the spice whole and grind it just before you use it. It is also never a bad idea to freeze any spare, try to remove as much air as possible and make sure it is kept sealed in the freezer to avoid moisture.

Here are some tips for maximising the shelf life of your spices:
• Store in an airtight container.
• Store in a cool, dark cupboard.
• Store away from direct heat or sunlight.
• Keep lid tightly closed when not in use.

 

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

(typical values per 100g):

Energy

1324

kj
Energy

319

kcal
Fat

11.9

g
  Of which saturates 

1.3

g
Carbohydrate

36.3

g
  Of which sugars

4.6

g
Fibre

40.2

g
Protein

9.6

g
Salt

0.1

g
 

 

ALERGY INFORMATION

Does the product contain any of the following?

YES NO
Cereals containing Gluten: wheat, rye, barley, oats, spelt, kamut or their hybridised strains.
Mollusc
Crustacean  shellfish and products thereof
Egg and products thereof
Fish and products thereof
Soya (soy) beans & protein and products thereof
Milk & Dairy (including lactose) and products thereof
Celery Seeds celeriac and products thereof
Mustard Seeds and products thereof
Lupin and products thereof
Sesame Seed and products thereof
Peanuts and products thereof
Nuts and products thereof (namely almond, hazelnut, walnut, cashew nut, pecan nut, brazil nut, pistachio nut, macademia nut and Queensland nut)
Added Sulphur Dioxide: (the product contains <10mg/Kg added Sulphur Dioxide in the form of SO2, Sulphites (E220,E221, E222, E223, E224, E226, E227, E228)
Please Note: Where products are indicated as not having an allergen present this refers to the product not being formulated or wholly derived from the particular ingredient. Allergen handling policies and procedures are in place through the supply chain to reduce the likelihood of cross contamination from allergens however this cannot be guaranteed.

 

Please contact us if you require any further information or for quotes on larger pack sizes.